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ASL 102: De'VIA Art Project

Cite Your Sources in MLA format

Here are a few examples to help you cite your sources in MLA format:

Citing Works of Art (viewed online)

Format: Artist. Title of Artwork. Year of Creation (if known). Title of Website in Italics, Website Publisher (if different than title), Date of publication, URL.

Example: Block, David. Crying Hands. Deaf Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2022, deaf-art.org/deaf-art/devia-posters/hands/.

*Note: Italicize titles of formal art work and include the date of creation after the title with a period. The Starry Night. 1889.


Citing an Image from the Web

Format: Author(s). “Title of Image.” Title of Website in Italics, Website Publisher (if different than title), Date of Publication/Posting, URL.

Example (No Title): Chuck Baird with brushes. National Association of the Deaf, 2022, www.nad.org/2012/02/14/remembering-chuck-baird-artist-of-life/.

*Note: For images without titles, create a descriptive title in plain text – no italics, no quotes. Capitalize only the first word and any proper nouns.
*Note: Italicize titles of formal art work and include the date of creation after the title with a period. The Starry Night. 1889.
*Note: Include an accessed date at the end if no date of publication/posting is available.
*Note: Image URLs should be from the actual website that hosts the image. Be careful with this. If you use Google or another search engine to find the image, if you copy the URL it may give you Google's search URL rather than the actual URL of the image's website.
*Note: You can usually omit the http:// unless needed to hyperlink.
*Note: For URLs longer than 3 lines, you can shorten the URL. Always retain the host (main website) of the URL.


How to Cite an Article or Page from a Website

Format: Author(s). “Title of Article or Page.” Title of Website in Italics, Website Publisher (if different than title), Date of publication, URL.

Example: “Chuck Baird.” Deaf Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2022, deaf-art.org/profiles/chuck-baird.

Example: “Chuck Baird.” DeafArt.org, www.deafart.org/Biographies/Chuck_Baird/chuck_baird.html. Accessed 7 Mar. 2022.

*Note:  Exclude publisher if title of website and publisher are the same.
*Note: If website does not have a date, add an access date at the end after the URL: Accessed 7 May 2016.
*Note: Do not include the http:// or https:// in the URL.


Citing Previously Published Articles (or PDFs) from Websites

Format: Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Journal, vol. #, no. #, Date of Publication, page number(s). Title of Website in Italics, Website Publisher (if different than title), Date of publication, URL.

Example: Durr, Patti. "De'VIA: Investigating Deaf Visual Art." Deaf Studies Today!, vol. 2, 2006, pp. 167-87. Deaf Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, 2022, deaf-art.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/DeVIAInvestigatingDeafVisualArtbyPattiDurr.pdf. 


How to Cite an Entire Book or Ebook (Print or Electronic)

Format: Author(s). Title of Book in Italics. Edition, Publisher, Year. Database Name in Italics. (if electronic), URL. 

*Note: if using a print book, skip the database name.


How to Cite Part of a Book or Ebook (Print or Electronic)

Format: Author(s). "Title of Part." Title of Book, edited by Editor, edition, vol. #, Publisher, Year, page number(s). Database Name (if electronic), URL.


How to Cite a Journal Article from a Database

Format: Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Journal, vol. #, no. #, Date of Publication, page number(s). Database Name (if electronic), URL.


Personal Interview:

Format: Interviewee. Interview. Conducted by Interviewer, Date of Interview.

Example: Smith, Jane. Interview. By John Doe, 24 Oct. 2015.

Additional MLA Examples

In-Text Citations

1 Author and Page Numbers

Place the author’s last name and page number in parenthesis. If the in-text citation is at the end of a sentence, place the period outside the parenthesis.

Example 1: (Hennessy 81).

Example 2: (Hennessy 81-82).


No Page Numbers

If a source has no page numbers, omit the page number. Keep in mind, most electronic sources do not include pages.

Example 1: ("Everyday Victims")

Example 2: (Jones)


No Author

If the source has no author, your in-text citation will use the title of the source that starts your works cited entry. The title may appear in the sentence itself or, abbreviated, before the page number in parenthesis.

Example 1: (“Noon” 508).

Example 2: (Faulkner’s Novels 25).

Example 3: (“Climate Model Simulations").


2 Authors

If the entry on the Works Cited page begins with the names of two authors, include both last names in the in-text citation, connected by and.

Example: (Dorris and Erdrich 23).


3+ Authors

If the source has three or more authors, include the first author’s last name followed by et al.

Example: (Burdick et al. 42).

Additional In-Text Citations Examples

Multiple Works with Same Title

Multiple Works with Same Title

A note for in-text citations:  If you have multiple articles on your Works Cited page with no authors that also have the same titles, use the next part of the citation to differentiate the sources in-text. This could be the database name or the name of the book or encyclopedia (or journal or website) that your article came from. You can shorten longer titles as long as it's clear which citation on your works cited page the in-text is referring to. See the examples below:


Works Cited 1: "China." CultureGrams, ProQuest, 2021.

Works Cited 2: "China." Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Nations, edited by M.S. Hill, 14th ed., vol. 4, Gale,                                                               2017, pp. 143-180. Global Issues in Context.

In-Text 1: ("China," CultureGrams).

In-Text 2: ("China," Worldmark Encyclopedia).

2 Works by the Same Author

Multiple Works by the Same Author

Sometimes you may discuss multiple works that are written by the same author. In this case, add the title of the work to your in-text citation, so your reader knows which work you are citing.

Example: (Morrison, Beloved 35). 

If you use the author's name or the title of the work in the sentence, you can exclude that information from your in-text citation.

Using Author's Name in the Sentence:

Example: Morrison writes, "Places, places are still there. If a house burns down, it's gone, but the place--the picture of it--stays" (Beloved 35).

Using Author's Name and Title of Work in the Sentence

Example: As Morrison writes in Beloved, "Places, places are still there. If a house burns down, it's gone, but the place--the picture of it--stays" (35).

Citing Images in a Presentation

MLA gives two different ways to cite an images in a presentation or paper depending on how you are using the image in your presentation. The difference depends on whether the image is just for illustration or decoration (a stand along image), or if you're going to refer to this image in your presentation (the image itself is part of the content of your presentation.

Option 1: Image is for Illustration or Decoration (not going to talk directly about the image during your presentation).

In this case, list the entire citation information in the caption of the image. Do not list it on your Works Cited page at the end.

Option 2: Image is Part of the Presentation (going to talk about the image specifically during your presentation)

​In this case, you'll still include a caption for the image, but the caption will only include an in-text citation, and the entire citation information will go on the Works Cited page like you with a regular source.


Examples

See the two different ways you could use the image below in a presentation, and how the citing would differ.

​Option 1: If the image below is on a slide about massage therapists, but you don't directly talk about the image, then you'd include the full citation information in the caption for the image. See below.

chair massage

Fig. 1: Massage Chair. Massage & Bodywork, vol. 28, no. 3, Dec. 2016, p. 14. Vocational and Career Collection.

Option 2: If you're displaying this image of the massage chair in order to talk about the correct positioning and demonstrate how someone should sit in the chair, meaning that you'll talk about this image and what it shows, then you would include the citation information in your Works Cited, and the caption would just include an in-text citation.

Fig. 1: Correct Positioning in a Massage Chair (Massage Chair).


Works Cited

Massage Chair. Massage & Bodywork, vol. 28, no. 3, Dec. 2016, p. 14. Vocational and Career Collection.

MLA Handouts